iSugio

Episode 10: Adventures In Japan Pt. II

by Miguel Douglas

@isugoi

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In this episode, we have our good friend Justin–who currently lives in Japan, join us once again as we discuss a variety of topics, mainly focusing on the Japan’s role in World War II, education system, and media coverage on the Fukushima disaster.

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Author: Miguel Douglas

As an avid viewer of both Japanese animation and cinema for more than a decade now, Miguel is primarily concerned with establishing a critical look into both mediums as legitimate forms of artistic, cultural, and societal understanding. Never one to simply look at a film or series based solely on superficiality, Miguel has dedicated himself towards bringing awareness to Asian entertainment and its various facets.

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Comments

  • Scythe

    In 9th grade we had an exchange student from japan in our History class when we were going over WWII. It did cause some problems as he freaked out about it and said the book lied ect. Apparently he had no idea about Pearl Harbor and thought we started the war.

    In 7th grade I remember bringing up the Japanese camps to my teachers when we were learning about the German camps. I think our teacher handled it well in saying “we can’t really teach it, but I will say America isn’t perfect we have made mistakes”.

    I must hear about the Christmas KFC O__O

    :D Eva panel in a class. I remember my one friend was going to give students extra credit if me and my brother came in the one day and they could remember our names.

  • Miguel Douglas

    Wow, that exchange student must’ve had a rough time!

  • Scythe

    Yeah he didn’t know much English and we didn’t have a translator at the time.

    That’s cool that Justin is able to live and work in japan effectively. I doubt I could imagine getting used to being fully immersed like that all the time. Different tv, food, media, writing, language has got to take some getting used to.

  • darkkodiak

    Wow, awesome episode. It really surprised me that Japan just skims over WWII, one of the biggest event in the world. It makes me wonder how history is taught in Germany. I guess pointing fingers isn’t right as Douglas pointed out that there are events in American history that isn’t taught. I for one really like this podcast because my main exposure to Japanese culture is through their movies, dramas, and anime.

  • Miguel Douglas

    Thanks for the comment darkkodiak. We pretty much came to the conclusion that every country decidedly “rearranges” their history, which makes for some great discussion topics.