iSugio

Episode 21: Wolf Children Ame and Yuki Review

by Miguel Douglas

@isugoi

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In this episode, Douglas, Shawn, and Blake review director Mamoru Hosoda’s 2012 anime film “Wolf Children Ame and Yuki” from Madhouse and Studio Chizu.


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Episode Structure:

[04:28] What were your initial thoughts about the film before you watched it?

[07:17] The film focuses a lot on Hana and her ability to be a good mother. She is also a single parent. How did this factor into your viewing her as a character?

[14:23] Considering Hosoda’s previous film Summer Wars and its exploration of family, Wolf Children is also a film that explores family. How do you think the exploration of family found in Wolf Children differs from that of Summer Wars and did you find the film’s focus on family something that resonated with you as a viewer?

[24:42] What are your thoughts on the narrative of the film being told primarily through the perspective of Yuki?

[37:52] Did you find Ame and Yuki’s growth throughout the film a natural progression or rather unexpected?

[47:52] Compared to Hosoda’s previous films, Wolf Children’s pacing is considerably slower. What are your thoughts on this choice?

[58:09] Along the same lines as the last question, Wolf Children’s animation is also very different from Hosoda’s previous films. Did you enjoy this change in animation style or not, and why?

[01:03:11] What are your thoughts on the film’s ending?

[01:11:40] Would you recommend this film to others?

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Author: Miguel Douglas

As an avid viewer of both Japanese animation and cinema for more than a decade now, Miguel is primarily concerned with establishing a critical look into both mediums as legitimate forms of artistic, cultural, and societal understanding. Never one to simply look at a film or series based solely on superficiality, Miguel has dedicated himself towards bringing awareness to Asian entertainment and its various facets.

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